Thursday, April 21, 2011

Android for Good at Google I/O 2011

By Zi Wang of the Android Team

Do you have an unlocked Android device that you no longer need? If you’re coming to Google I/O, you can make a world of difference by donating it to Android for Good.

Android for Good evolved from a program at Google started by one passionate engineer with an idea to help the developing world through technology. A small team collected Android devices from Googlers around the world and organized their donation to groups including Grameem’s AppLab Community Knowledge Worker Initiative in Uganda, Save the Elephants in Kenya, V-Day in the Democratic Republic of Congo, VillageReach in Mozambique, VetAid in Tanzania & Kenya, and UNHCR in Central Africa.

This year, we want to make it easy for everyone at Google I/O to get involved as well. We know you like to keep up to speed with the latest and greatest technology, so you may have an older Android device you don’t need anymore. If that device is unlocked (such as the T-Mobile G1, Nexus One, or Nexus S) and in good working condition, bring it along to Google I/O and drop it off at the Android for Good booth, located on the third floor of Moscone Center. Although it might seem old to you, that device could mean a new beginning when placed in the right hands.

Zi Wang is a Product Marketing Manager on the Android Team. In his 20% time, Zi is working on a very cool project called Android in Space.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor

20 comments:

  1. What if you're not going to Google I/O 2011, and you're in a different country (like the UK)..and you have an Android phone you'd like to donate?

    Is there anything in place to send a phone to the local Google UK office if say "Android for Good" is suitably marked on the package?

    Just asking..

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  2. @Arron: That's a great question. I'll see if I can find an answer for you.

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  3. I've got an extra N1 from my recent upgrade to the NS so I'l bring it along to i/o. Thanks for doing this guys!

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  4. It is a good project and it would be great if there would be such initiatives around the world. I noticed that not only are the wages lower in developing countries, additionally (i.e. in Brazil or Argentina), modern smartphones cost 2-3 times what they cost in the USA. I am sure that we would see some good apps if more people around the world had access to android smartphones.

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  5. ... and while Apple declares profits and people rage about it. you'll never hear them ever giving away anything. This is why I'll forever root for google. It's not all about profits and market cap but about how much you pour into the lives of those around you.

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  6. love the android device crazily,and furthermore help the android system as steady as iOS

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  7. And don't forget the app which is used by Czech National park to save trees :-)

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  8. I'd also like to donate an old ht-03a/magic, not going to I/O

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  9. yay, I'll bring along my uber cute dev 1

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  10. I too have a few Android phones that I can give out but I am not attending Google I/O. Would I be able to do it?

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  11. Thanks to Google for doing this. I'm originally for Kenya and appreciate the gesture. I'll be at Google I/O 2011 and will do my part.

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  12. I think this is a great initiative - working with Vetaid we have really seen the benefit of distributing second hand phones in East Africa - so much better than sending out clapped out PCs! If you are interested in what we have managed to do with 20 old G1s, take a look at our blog : http://goo.gl/EwdLD - hope it might inspire some of you to send us some more phones!

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  13. nice idea and project to save the world :D

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  14. Excellent Idea. Let's extend this project to others countries.

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  15. no I love my original droid haha just kiding.

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  16. Hi Everyone:

    If you're not coming to Google I/O but have one (or more!) unlocked Android device in good condition, please email flee@google.com, and we'll figure out a way for you to get your device to our program. We will test and, if possible, refurbish, donated devices and wipe them of all personally identifiable information.

    Thanks!

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  17. This is a great project. Any chance one that's here in the US could get a donated phone? Someone that is living at or below the poverty and is in need?

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  18. I will start developing for android this summer most probably, is there any chance to have a donate phone here in Lebanon as its not so easy to do so here :( I know that might be a bit out of subject but I believe its worth a try :)

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  19. Me too :(
    I know absolutely everything there is to know about Android, Roms, Radios, Kernels, Apps, even made a few tutorials here for newbies and helped them a notch with their android experience, even persuaded some of them to choose the open platform instead of the closed one (you know which one) and succeeded a couple of times ...
    The only thing is I don't have an Android phone.
    Never had/ I simply can't afford it. Every single day, in order to tame my gigantic wish forit, makes me go on youtube and watch unboxings and reviews of people that are lucky enough to own one... I often tell my friends stories (lies) about how can I make their phones, faster and better if they can give them to me for just one day...
    And, at the end, I know that no one will ever donate me a phone nor I will be able to buy one in the near future, cause that's just the way the world goes, but I'll keep on dreaming and hoping, and keep inventing new stories for my friends and keep track of those unboxings. Because, truly, there's nothing much I can do differently...
    Goce - Macedonia

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  20. You guys know that dumping free phones in developing markets actually kills small phone start-ups that try to make cheap phones. Yeah some guys gets a new phone but others lose their jobs. Dumping used goods is bad.

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